Marc Alan Goodman’s Building Strange Weather Blog — Step One: Finding A New Home

WILLIAMSBURG, BROOKLYN: As far as small, privately-run recording studios go, my own Strange Weather has been pretty nomadic in its short lifespan. Since 2003 when I first opened under that name as a home studio in the suburbs of Philadelphia, Strange Weather has seen five different locations, each one a significant improvement over the last.

Marc Alan Goodman

I returned to Philadelphia after spending five years in NYC as a student and musician with a plan to make recording music the rest of my life. The studio’s fourth incarnation saw a move back to NYC with a small, single room space in Greenpoint, and the fifth landed us in our current two-room, control-room-centric space in South Williamsburg.

Now, we’re preparing to make our largest and hopefully final move into a new space in Brooklyn, as well as to transition into a fully commercial enterprise. The new space is being designed by Wes Lachot, and will be acoustically viable to compete with the city’s most famous surviving rooms while pricing itself low enough to be affordable to the average musician. If that sounds like a tough spot to squeeze into then you’re starting to see why I’m writing this!

I’m hoping this blog will give home studio owners insight into how to apply professional and long-lasting design concepts to their own space while also giving potential commercial studio owners ideas on how to keep build costs as low as possible. So let’s start with a little bit of background…

WHY NOW? WHY GROUND UP?

Up to now, the focus at Strange Weather has been on building up a high-grade gear list while keeping overhead (and hence pricing) low. All of our previous spaces have been rentals and we’ve done our best to keep infrastructure costs to a minimum by seeking out spaces that already suit our needs as closely as possible. The business model has worked, and as we’ve opened our doors more and more to outside engineers they’ve been very happy with their experience. However there are a few major limitations to our current space.

First off our live room is very small. It’s large enough to record great sounding drums but not for the entire band to play together comfortably. Do most musicians really record that way nowadays? Not in my experience. However everyone wants to feel like they can, and I sure as hell want to be able to when possible. I’d say that about forty percent of our potential work gets turned away because the live room doesn’t meet the client’s needs.

Strange Weather's current control room, located in East Williamsburg.

The second major issue is that the control room is mostly untreated and no matter how much time I spend trying to make the room viable for outside engineers it still takes them time to adjust. Ideally, to run a commercial space I would like to have a control room that anyone can walk into, mix a song, and when they get, home have exactly what they expected. This is only possible in a room designed from the ground up to be acoustically accurate.

So, in order for the studio to continue to grow, we need to find a larger space and be able to invest in genuine infrastructure. As anyone who records sound knows the two most important factors in making a great recording are the source and the space it’s being made in. It’s more important than any microphone, any preamp, or any piece of gear. Without a good sounding source in a good sounding room, it’s nearly impossible to get a good sound. Strange Weather has come as far as it can investing in all of the other facets of the process and now, it’s time for the final, big move.

LEARNING THE BROOKLYN REAL ESTATE MARKET: PROPERTY TYPES, FAR RATINGS & MORE!

The first hurdle in moving the studio was, of course, finding the space itself. Rental properties pose a very difficult question for recording studios: How much can we afford to spend on build out if our lease is only for a limited period of time?

In NYC in particular, everyone has to assume that they’ll only be in a space as long as their initial lease. If things go well and you can stay then great, but realistically if business is good that means the space is now worth more than when you started which means the price is likely to go up. Knowing this, my goal was to purchase a property.

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  • Congratulations! Let me know if you need help!

  • Congratulations! Let me know if you need help!