Fiedler Audio Releases AD 480 Reverb – Fully Featured Reverb for iOS

June 24, 2014 by  

The AD 480 Reverb app from Fiedler Audio offers extensive reverb features for iOS devices, with unique interfaces for iPhone and iPad, respectively.

What this plugin offers that differs from other iOS effects are routing options and a larger variety of sound possibilities. The “Pro” version comes with 108 presets that are contained within a preset manager. The app can also route audio with 44.1kHz – 96kHz sample rates through its 24 in/out matrix via USB or external audio interface and is also internally routable via Audiobus 2.0 compatibility.

AD 480 minimizes clunky-ness on iPad with spaced out faders and large buttons.

AD 480 minimizes clunky-ness on iPad with spaced out faders and large buttons.

The AD 480 Reverb from Feidler Audio is available now in three versions: AD 480 Free, AD 480 Basic ($3.99), and AD 480 Pro ($14.99). Here are complete features from Feidler Audio:

AD 480 Reverb

Pro quality studio reverb effect for iOS. – Use it with Audiobus, Inter-app Audio, iTunes music library and multichannel audio interfaces.

Enhance and enrich your recordings and live sound with the perfect sonic texture of your choice.

Ratios correspond with the clean interface on the iPhone.

Ratios correspond with the clean interface on the iPhone.

Record, process and export directly for lightning fast creative work!

The AD 480 Reverb delivers a realistic acoustic sound with a fine character in best studio quality. From small boxes to the Grand Canyon – practically any size and shape is possible. Enhance and enrich your recordings and live sound with the acoustic space or texture of your choice. The user interface is extremely intuitive and designed from the ground up for today’s touch screens. It gives you quick and responsive access to all parameters and on the iPad it offers a special graphics mode (stage mode) for low light environments. The MIDI functions let you fully remote control / automate the AD 480 and the audio routing matrix gives you greatest flexibility in a multi app / multi channel environment.

Features

The AD 480 comes in three variants: AD 480 free, AD 480 basic and AD 480 pro.

  • professional reverb sound effect with variable room size
  • full Audiobus integration
  • supports internal and external audio interfaces (USB class compliant or MFi)
  • InterApp Audio
  • Dynamic Upgrade (all present versions of the AD 480 on your iDevice are automatically upgraded to the highest version installed, i.e. if you have AD 480 free, basic and pro installed, they all become pro!)
  • Itunes file sharing
  • iOS 6 or newer
  • iPad 2, iPod touch 5G, iPhone 4S and newer

from version AD 480 basic:

  • extensive filter layout for a wide spectrum of sound
  • access to all sound parameters
  • AD 480 basic provides inApp purchase for upgrading to pro

from version AD 480 pro:

  • 108 excellent presets
  • professional preset management for MIDI, audio routing and reverb parameters
  • routing matrix, with support up to 24 input and 24 output channels
  • MIDI communication over network and USB-MIDI interfaces, plus inter-app MIDI
  • supports sample rates of 44.1 kHz – 96 kHz
  • latencies down to 64 samples
  • special GUI mode for use in low-light environments (e.g. on stage, iPad only)
  • background audio for multitasking with other apps
  • Audio Recording, Playback and Offline Processing
  • Import and Export of Audio Files
  • Itunes Library Access

Death By Audio Announces New Guitar Pedal – Reverberation Machine

June 4, 2014 by  

Right in our own backyard, some brave Brooklyn pedal builders have crafted a new reverb pedal that can hit anything from soft whispers to complete obliteration.

Reverberation Machine from Death by Audio was inspired by their limited Ty Segall Reverberation pedal back in 2013 – time to get a piece of the pie. Parameters of the pedals feature Volume, Altitude, Reverb and Reverb Tone. The Altitude parameter is where this pedal soars!

For those who crave some more from their reverb pedal, the Reverberation Machine beckons.

For those who crave something more from their reverb pedal, the Reverberation Machine beckons.

Reverberation Machine is available now for $200 MSRP. Here are more details from Death By Audio:

The Reverberation Machine is a synthetic atmosphere creator. Use the effect on any instrument to add depth and simulate different environments. Experiment and combine a variety of settings to obtain the perfect ambiance for your sound.

The controls on this pedal are straightforward. Volume, Altitude, Reverb Blend and two distinct reverb flavors: Bright Sunshine and Dark Star. Altitude adjusts the gain structure of the reverb and the clean simultaneously creating exciting new reverberation soundscapes that span from subtle to wild.

Although the controls are extremely easy to use and intuitive, there is a vast array of sounds. Everything from simulations of vintage amp verb, playing in a cave, large concert halls, and space ships being sucked into wormholes.

The Five Main Types of Reverb, and How to Mix with Them — by Jamey Staub

November 3, 2013 by  

“Just put some reverb on it.”

The EMT 140 plate -- a classic way to reverberate your sound.

The EMT 140 plate — a classic way to reverberate your audio.

That request just pisses me off. What reverb? Which style? Hall? Room? Plate? Chamber? Spring? Tunnel? Cave? Well? Gated? Phased? Flanged? Real Space? Analog? Digital? Plug In?

There are so many choices that it can be daunting to pick the right reverb for the right job.

The many considerations needed to decide which reverb to use will be discussed in this article: I will present the points that I use to determine what reverb I employ in the mix process, that conveys the feeling for the particular emotion I wish to invoke in the listener. I will also discuss the many types of natural reverb and reverb simulators that exist in today’s world of music production.

REVERB

Reverb is defined by the Merriam-Webster dictionary as:

re•ver•ber•a•tion
noun
: a sound that echoes
: an effect or result that is not wanted

I think this is a lame definition. Reverb is a sound that echoes, but the echoes that create reverberation are extremely complex – from the onset of the initial reflection to the last heard decay is a multitude of echoes that have variations in time, repetition and frequency response.

Secondly, in the world of mixing, reverb is definitely a sound that is wanted and useful in the creation of a wonderful listening experience!

The type of reverb depends on the size and shape of the room that the sound echoes in. A square room provides many less reflective surfaces than a cathedral. The material of the reflective surface determines the frequency response of the initial reflections and subsequent echoes that result in the tail or length of the reverb. The harder the surface, and the more surface angles and lengths of the room, the longer the repetition of echoes occur, resulting in a longer tail or reverberation time.

The first “REVERB” observed by humans was probably heard in a canyon or a cave when we were known as Neanderthal. The repetition of echoes in an enclosed or open space was probably quite frightening and intriguing.

I remember as a kid a place in the mountains called Echo Rock where I would yell something and hear it echo after 1 or 2 seconds. Further down the mountain where the walls were closer together, I would shout and hear a rapid repetition of echoes that I later learned was “reverb.”

The main difference between echo and reverb is the number of repetitions of sound per millisecond. A reverberation is perceived when the reflected sound wave reaches your ear in less than 0.1 second after the original sound wave. Since the original sound wave is still held in memory, there is no time delay between the perception of the reflected sound wave and the original sound wave. The two sound waves tend to combine as one very prolonged sound wave.

For the purpose of this article I will define some terms that I use to describe reverb:

Sound reflections, and their variations, shape our perceptions of reverb.

Sound reflections, and their variations, shape our perceptions of reverb.

Once a sound event occurs, the first echoes are called “Early Reflections.” These are generally 5 to 20 milliseconds in length.

After that the sound has had a chance to bounce around the room and becomes the “Body” of the reverb. This can last anywhere from 20 milliseconds to infinity.

The last part of the reverb I will call the “Decay or Tail.” This is the last perceptible sounds and can be from .1 to several seconds. The end of the tail occurs when the sound pressure level of the echoes reaches 60dB – close to inaudibility for human ears.

Without getting too technical it should be mentioned that the reverb time of a space has been defined as the time it takes for the initial sound pressure level (SPL) to be reduced by 60dB (for example if the initial SPL is 100 dB, the time it takes to go down to 40 dB would be the RT60 time).

Types of Reverb

The most basic types of reverb fall into five categories.

HALL
CHAMBER
ROOM
PLATE
SPRING

The first three are naturally occurring phenomena within a physical space and the last two are manmade devices. Though there are many other types that could be mentioned, I will focus on the aforementioned reverb types and their typical uses in today’s music mixes.

The optimum reverberation time for a space in which music is played depends on the type of music that is to be played in the space. Orchestral music is often written with a particular reverb time of the hall to utilize the decay to enhance harmonic structure.  Rooms used for speech typically need a shorter reverberation time so that speech can be understood more clearly.

You can hear some academically-oriented examples of reverb in action here.

HALL

This term refers to the reverb heard in a concert hall.

Generally the construction of a music hall attempts to produce a reverb that lasts anywhere from 1.2 to 3 seconds or longer. The characteristics include an audible cluster of initial reflections followed by a full body and a decay that ends with a rolloff of high-frequency content.

There are many well-known great sounding Concert Halls throughout the world. Boston Symphony Hall, Vienna’s Musikverein, Walt Disney Concert Hall are a few noted for their accurate and tasteful reverberation characteristics. The most obvious use is for Symphony and Orchestral performance.

If you can’t afford to rent one of these Halls, turn to the digital world.

A Lexicon 224 trademark was a particularly lush reverb tail.

A Lexicon 224 trademark was a particularly lush reverb tail.

The Lexicon 224 and 480 were my favorite boxes years ago. Today there are numerous plug-ins that model hall reverbs including Lexicon, Waves and convolution reverbs (convolution attempts to simulate actual physical spaces using impulse responses).

I used the Waves TrueVerb plug-in on a recent mix for the artist Riley Goldstein. On the song “Everything,” which you can hear on her ReverbNation page, the string recording utilized the Vienna orchestra in GigaStudio and I added a touch of 2.4 second Waves Hall Reverb during the mix.

CHAMBER

A chamber is usually a smaller physical space than a hall that results in more clarity yet still provides a blend of harmonic content and dispersion of sound.

A chamber is usually rectangular and can be constructed from cement or wood. I also include a stairwell or hallway in the chamber family. The frequency response and decay is dependent upon construction material and size. The typical chamber reverb varies from .4 to 1.2 seconds.

The original use of these type of rooms was for small ensembles that came to be known as Chamber Orchestras. I was in Vienna for a wedding and had the good fortune of listening to a chamber orchestra in  the castle up on the hill.

The room was all natural wood and glass windows behind the stage. The eight musicians played very interesting counterpoint and the shorter reverberation allowed me to hear each instrument’s line clearly without becoming muddy. The warm reflections of the wood softened the overall tones of the violins and violas and allowed the low end of the contrabass to be heard clearly.

In pop music, the Beatles used the chambers built below Abbey Road Studios for vocal effects — you can hear an example of that that here.

If you mute the right channel (direct vocals,) you can hear the chamber effect in the left channel. Another great example of using a chamber to get a specific sound is quite apparent on the drum sound on “When the Levee Breaks.” John Bonham was recorded at the base of a stairwell in the poorhouse, Headly Grange.

ROOM

This term refers to a shorter RT60, typically from .2 to 1 second.

Imagine yourself in a conference room where you have a strong initial reflection followed by a quick series of echoes that constitute the body and a tail that decays quickly with minimal frequency rolloff. Then again, imagine being in a gymnasium where the hard reflective surfaces provide a great deal of initial reflections while the decay lasts longer as the reflections get lost up in the high ceilings and corners.

Again, the room reverb characteristic is varied depending on physical size and construction material. Common uses of room reverb can be heard on many rock recordings from Aerosmith to Led Zeppelin.

In that era, many engineers would close mic the guitar amp using a dynamic cardiod as well as place a distant mic around 8 – 15 ft back from the cabinet in omni , to pic up the room sound. The two mics were either separately recorded or combined and recorded to one track.

When Jamey's in the box, the Audio Ease Altiverb convolution plugin is a go-to.

When Jamey’s in the box, the Audio Ease Altiverb convolution plugin is a go-to.

A great example of this can be heard in the opening riff of this song.  “Dancing Days” by Led Zeppelin. One of my favorite digital reverbs dedicated to room reverb is the Lexicon PCM 60. There are quite a few plug-ins that produce room reverbs, but the ones I use the most are TrueVerb and Audio Ease Altiverb.

PLATE

The plate reverb is a manmade device that implements a sheet or plate of metal that vibrates when a sound wave strikes the surface.

At one end or corner is a transducer that emits the sound wave. As the wave propagates through the metal, another transducer receives the sound at different times and levels depending on the construction material of the plate. My observation is that there are minimal initial reflections but a full bodied reverb and a smooth tail. The RT60 can be manipulated using mechanical dampers that touch the surface and reduce vibration of the plate.

In the late 1980’s and 1990’s I used the EMT 140 at Greene Street Recording, Soho NYC extensively on vocals and drums (snare in particular.) It is also interesting to put a delay in front the plate to get a predelay – great for lead vocal in a ballad.

When I don’t have an actual plate I love the Lexicon PCM 70, and a plug-in that emulates the EMT 140 quite well is the Universal Audio version.

I used the Waves plug-in RVerb Compact with a plate setting of 1.7 sec for the chorus vocals on the newly released Luscious Jackson song “Show Us What You Got” and can be first heard at 00:20 — check it out on YouTube below.

SPRING

A spring reverb is similar to a plate reverb in that it is a manmade device that utilizes transducers to produce and receive the sound waves via the physical device – in this case a spring.

Spring reverbs have noticeable frequency characteristics such as resonances in the body and filter changes throughout the decay. These have variable RT60 times controlled by spring tension, construction material and dampers. They are often found in guitar amplifiers.

A classic spring reverb is the one found in the Fender Twin Reverb Amplifier. Engineers have taken them out of the cabinet to use for mixing. Also the Furman RV-1 and Orban 111B have very cool sounds.  I built a spring reverb from a garage door spring with fairly good results.

Spring reverbs are great for electric guitar and vocals as well as woodwinds. You can hear the spring bouncing in this song by The White Stripes:

For a complete discussion on Spring Reverbs visit Amplified Parts here.

Summary

This discussion is a basic introduction to reverb. There are many other types that deserve exploration such as gated, phased, flanged, non-linear, tube, ductwork, trash can, reverse to name a few as well as some that have not been invented yet.

The use of reverbs is crucial in mixing music and dialog. Whether you are able to use natural occurring spaces or manmade devices, reverb adds ambiance, tone and emotion to your mixes. They can define a mix wholly or just be used as an effect for a section or a single snare hit.

Whether you are mixing the New York Symphony or a vocal and guitar, the right reverb will bring your mix alive and take it to a place you’ve never been. So if you want to add some special sauce to your mix… NOW you can just throw some reverb on it.

Jamey Staub is a Producer/Mixer that loves analog gear and is amused by the attempt to copy and emulate it. He recently mixed the new album by Luscious Jackson, Magic Hour.

UVI Releases Reverb Plug-In – Sparkverb

October 6, 2013 by  

Paris-based developer UVI has just released Sparkverb, which promises to build a unique workflow for speedy discovery of applying reverb in unique ways.

The interface can be as simple or as complex as the user needs it to be with a resizable GUI. While allowing users to discover new ways to apply reverb, Sparkverb can also function as a traditional reverb, covering basic to infinite decays and anywhere in between.

Let UVI's new reverb plugin spark your creativity with more results and less knob twiddling.

Let UVI’s new reverb plugin spark your creativity with more results and less knob twiddling.

UVI’s new Sparkverb plugin is available now for $199.00 MSRP for Mac and PC in AAX, AU, RTAS and VST formats.

Here are more features from UVI:

SPACE RE:DEFINED

With a cutting-edge algorithmic design, Sparkverb breaks the boundaries of contemporary reverbs giving users modern and innovative controls that dramatically enhance usability, speed and creative freedom while delivering breathtaking sound quality and remarkable CPU efficiency.

SOPHISTICATED DESIGN
Enormous sonic range, fast and efficient workflow

Easily traverse everything from natural sounding spaces to infinite, shimmering ambiences with stunning depth and fidelity throughout the entire spectrum. This type of range typically implies a dense and complex interface – not in Sparkverb.

Usability and workflow were pivotal considerations in development.

A great deal of care was taken to allow a high degree of customization with the fewest controls possible, resulting in less time spent fidgeting and more time being productive.

At the core of Sparkverb’s interface is a frequency-based spectrum editor; use it to sculpt and refine your sound with phenomenal speed and control. Adjust decay globally and across multiple bands with hi/lo multipliers and crossovers directly on a single canvas. It’s an entirely new way to work with reverb.

All other controls are clearly arranged and labelled, including A/B comparison, making fine-tuning a painless process.

Dialling in a reverb, simple or complex, has never been this fast

EXPLORE – WITH OR
WITHOUT BOUNDARIES

From subtle to radical, or anywhere in-between

Sparkverb shines in traditional mixing sessions but was designed to be an exceptionally flexible creative tool as well. Discover new spaces and explore the full range of sonic possibilities effortlessly with built in mutation and randomization controls.

These functions are made even more useful by parameter locks available on every control.

Experiment within prescribed boundaries such as a fixed mix amount or pitch modulation to find exciting variations that work for your specific need. Another innovative tool comes in the form of the Preset Voyager.

At launch, Sparkverb creates a 2-dimensional array of all presets on your machine; simply toggle the Preset Voyager display and click-drag between preset nodes to freely interpolate new settings. Watch controls update in real time to see what’s happening and create new presets to redefine the space – the possibilities are limitless.

PSP Audioware Launches SpringBox — Spring Reverb Plugin for Mac/PC

April 22, 2013 by  

Here’s a beautiful start for your in-the-box adventures this week.

PSP Audioware, the Polish upstarts behind a plethora of highly prized plugins, have just launched PSP SpringBox, a hardware spring reverb emulation for Mac and PC (VST, AAX, RTAS).

A painstaking re-creation of the moving coil reverb units made famous for populating guitar amps and Hammond B3 organs, the distinctive sustain and metallic undertones of spring reverb have gone on to prove highly desirable for guitar, drums and many more mixing applications.

PSP wants you to spring into spring with SpringBox!

PSP wants you to spring into spring with SpringBox!

There’s a special intro offer to sweeten the pot (along with your mix). Until April 30, 2013 PSP SpringBox can be purchased for $49. Starting May 1st, the regular price of $69 kicks in. Owners of the PSP Effects pack qualify for an even better discount.

Here are more details, from the fine peeps of PSP:

PSP SpringBox is an emulation of a hardware spring reverberator (VST, AAX and RTAS for Windows; AudioUnit, VST, AAX and RTAS for Mac OSX). It recreates several features typical of a spring reverb, such as a convincing “boing” on transients and a repeatable resonating musical character with an adjustable presence.

A selection of configurations from two to six springs total is provided, as well as the ability to set stereo spread and pan/balance configured to suit various mix setups – from a typical guitar reverb to a creative uses as a send reverb in the mix. Thanks to PSP SpringBox’s two channel A and B settings setup and range of presets operation is fast and easy.

Hear SpringBox in action via the magic of YouTube:

 

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